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Contributors

Filtering by Tag: safety record

Putting together the safety puzzle

Drill Safe

 
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A few years ago, Major Drilling reached the milestone of working more than 7,000,000 hours without a lost time injury globally. Getting to this point was like putting together a large puzzle with hundreds of pieces. Every employee holds a piece of the puzzle and when we all work safely, we are placing our piece in the right spot to help form the picture of a workplace where every employee returns home. When assembling a jigsaw puzzle with so many pieces, one of the basic strategies is to start by putting together the outside edges and then work your way into the more difficult pieces in the centre.

In safety, the outside edges of our puzzle consist of the key programs and principles that form the framework of our systems.  Some of these include:

  • Communications - One of the keys to improving our performance has been for managers to support safety by having positive safety interactions. Dean Connett, HSEC Manager for Major Drilling America feels that communication and interactions have helped his branch work more than 3 years LTI free. "We decided as management in one of our management meetings that we need to be visible on our sites and spend more time coaching our crews. This has yielded results as the crews feel appreciated and valued.”

  • Take 5 Risk Assessment - We adopted the TAKE 5 program as our field level risk assessment tool in 2008. Use of TAKE 5 helps to identify site-specific risks that are based on the task you are doing and the environment where you are performing the task. Identification and elimination of these jobsite risks is a large part of our safety system and has been one of the keys to our success. Juan Coronel, an entry level employee in Argentina was asked what has helped his branch achieve more than 2 years LTI free “TAKE 5. It’s a perfect way to identify hazards and assess risks, individually and in a group, to eliminate or reduce the risk, so the task can be performed safely.”

  • 10 Lifesaving Rules - The company introduced an easy to follow safety program summary we call our 10 Lifesaving Rules. These rules were developed after reviewing our incident history, evaluating our worksites, and working with our clients. Sylvie Gaudet, the HR & HSEC coordinator in our corporate office believes these rules have helped reinforce safety for our high-risk activities. “These 10 Lifesaving Rules serve as a reminder to all employees of what kind of activities have high potential for serious injury. By following these rules we can keep ourselves and our co-workers safe every day”.

  • Right and Responsibility to Refuse Unsafe Work - Every employee has the ability and responsibility to refuse to work with unsafe equipment, in an unsafe location, or without the proper training for the task. Recently two of our employees exercised this right by refusing to take a truck mounted rig onto a dirt road that was not safe to travel. Despite pressure from the road contractor and drill consultant for our client, our crew held their ground and clearly explained what needed to be done to make the road safe. After reviewing the road with our crews, the client agreed to fix the road and the rig is now onsite drilling. By not exposing the rigs to unsafe roads, we avoided significant risk to our employees and equipment and were able to demonstrate our commitment to safety with our client.

These are just a few of the pieces of the puzzle that help us remain safe each day. Each day we challenge our crews to think about their own piece of the safety puzzle and how their decisions and actions shape our puzzle. By committing to safe production on our sites, we can place these individual pieces into the complete safety picture and we will end up reaching even greater safety milestones in the future.

Putting together the safety puzzle

Drill Safe

 
sponsor major drilling.png
 

A few years ago, Major Drilling reached the milestone of working more than 7,000,000 hours without a lost time injury globally. Getting to this point was like putting together a large puzzle with hundreds of pieces. Every employee holds a piece of the puzzle and when we all work safely, we are placing our piece in the right spot to help form the picture of a workplace where every employee returns home. When assembling a jigsaw puzzle with so many pieces, one of the basic strategies is to start by putting together the outside edges and then work your way into the more difficult pieces in the centre.

In safety, the outside edges of our puzzle consist of the key programs and principles that form the framework of our systems.  Some of these include:

  • Communications - One of the keys to improving our performance has been for managers to support safety by having positive safety interactions.  Dean Connett, HSEC Manager for Major Drilling America feels that communication and interactions have helped his branch work more than 3 years LTI free. "We decided as management in one of our management meetings that we need to be visible on our sites and spend more time coaching our crews. This has yielded results as the crews feel appreciated and valued.”
  • Take 5 Risk Assessment - We adopted the TAKE 5 program as our field level risk assessment tool in 2008.  Use of TAKE 5 helps to identify site-specific risks that are based on the task you are doing and the environment where you are performing the task.   Identification and elimination of these jobsite risks is a large part of our safety system and has been one of the keys to our success.   Juan Coronel, an entry level employee in Argentina was asked what has helped his branch achieve more than 2 years LTI free “TAKE 5.  It’s a perfect way to identify hazards and assess risks, individually and in a group, to eliminate or reduce the risk, so the task can be performed safely.” 
  • 10 Lifesaving Rules - The company introduced an easy to follow safety program summary we call our 10 Lifesaving Rules.  These rules were developed after reviewing our incident history, evaluating our worksites, and working with our clients.   Sylvie Gaudet, the HR & HSEC coordinator in our corporate office believes these rules have helped reinforce safety for our high-risk activities.  “These 10 Lifesaving Rules serve as a reminder to all employees of what kind of activities have high potential for serious injury.  By following these rules we can keep ourselves and our co-workers safe every day”. 
  • Right and Responsibility to Refuse Unsafe Work - Every employee has the ability and responsibility to refuse to work with unsafe equipment, in an unsafe location, or without the proper training for the task.  Recently two of our employees exercised this right by refusing to take a truck mounted rig onto a dirt road that was not safe to travel.  Despite pressure from the road contractor and drill consultant for our client, our crew held their ground and clearly explained what needed to be done to make the road safe.  After reviewing the road with our crews, the client agreed to fix the road and the rig is now onsite drilling.   By not exposing the rigs to unsafe roads, we avoided significant risk to our employees and equipment and were able to demonstrate our commitment to safety with our client. 

These are just a few of the pieces of the puzzle that help us remain safe each day. Each day we challenge our crews to think about their own piece of the safety puzzle and how their decisions and actions shape our puzzle. By committing to safe production on our sites, we can place these individual pieces into the complete safety picture and we will end up reaching even greater safety milestones in the future.

Master Drilling strives to keep the environment safe

Drill Safe

 
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By W.C. Olivier and F.J.N. Stassen

Since May 2014 Master Drilling has employed a fully dedicated rehabilitation crew at one of its surface exploration drill sites in the Northern Cape in order to keep up with the rapid drill rate on site.

The appointment of geologists and geohydrologists in 2013 as part of the Master Drilling team not only created a focus on producing a quality service through the delivery of core and other drill samples of the highest quality but also on delivering a rehabilitated drills site and boreholes which are left with water quality of the highest possible standards. General workers have been trained as field technicians to rehabilitate drilling sites and since 2015 have been utilizing water bailers to remove the bulk of pollutants produced during drilling after which hydrocarbon absorbing socks are emplaced in the boreholes to remove any last trace amounts of hydrocarbon pollutants.

Photographic reporting and measuring of water samples using an interface probe are employed to ensure borehole water quality prior to drilling and prevent any traces of hydrocarbons remaining in any boreholes.

Since the implementation of this initiative drilling crews have become more aware of the importance of protecting groundwater and improved borehole water qualities are a testament to the fact that drilling crews now take more care during drilling operations not to pollute valuable groundwater resources.

Since 2013 Master Drilling has rehabilitated more than a 1000 boreholes on this site and are currently investigation the use of more sophisticated on site analytical tools to measure the water quality to more accurate levels and improve the water quality even further.

Master Drilling’s management would like to congratulate the employees of this site for the implementation and maintaining of this critical environmental protection effort. This shows that Master Drilling is truly committed towards and supports environmentally friendly mining.

Master Drilling achieves impressive safety milestones

Drill Safe

 
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By W.C. Olivier and T.C.P. Booysen

Master Drilling continues to achieve impressive safety figures at four of its exploration drilling sites raking up an impressive 1212 injury free days between two of its sites and 2729 Loss Time Injury Free (LTI) days between another two operations at the end of September 2017.

Master Drilling has been conducting underground drilling near Carletonville, North-West province since August 2015, re-opening and drilling new drainage holes for its client between various underground mining levels. Since starting this contract Master Drilling has not had 1 injury to date on this site. The operation thus achieved 780 injury free days at the end of September 2017.

In July 2016 Master Drilling commenced surface exploration drilling near Rustenburg. Core drilling operations consists of four surface drill rigs running on a 24hr shift targeting the Merensky Reef and UG2 at depths well over 1000m. This site recently achieved a year without any injuries since the project commenced in 2016. This Rustenburg operations continuous its great safety performance and achieved a total of 432 safe days at the end of September 2017.

Master Drilling’s exploration division achieved 1157 LTI free days at one of its surface exploration and grade control drilling projects in the Northern Cape at the end of September 2017.  The site has been operational since March 2013 and at its peak was operating more than 20 drilling rigs and employed more than 200 persons. Currently the site has 17 operational drill rigs and has achieved a Loss Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTFIR) of zero for the past two years much lower than the company’s LTIFR target of three.

Since January 2013 Master Drilling has been conducting underground coal exploration drilling near Bethal, Mpumalanga.  The site achieved an extremely impressive safety milestone with 4 years LTI free in June 2017 and are currently standing on 1572 LTI free days.

Master Drilling’s safety management team would like to congratulate these sites on their excellent safety performance thus far for 2017. These safety achievements are a testament to the effective safety management systems, continuous improvement, measuring and monitoring of any non-compliances to health, safety and legal requirements and are a reflection of a good health and safety culture within the company.

Mining operation achieves impressive safety record

Drill Safe

 
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Two underground diamond drilling sites, both part of mining industry leader ROSOND (Pty) Ltd, have achieved impressive safety records of five years of “zero harm”.

Amandelbult Dishaba Underground Diamond Drilling, near Thabazimbi in the Limpopo province, achieved this milestone at the end of last year, while Evander Underground Diamond Drilling in Mpumalanga celebrated its accident-free record on 12 February.

Other ROSOND operations that have achieved notable safety successes in lost time injury (LTI) are the Rasimone South (5 years LTI on 5 December 2016), Kloof (5 years LTI on 19 December 2016), and the Amandelbult Tumela (5 years LTI on 28 February) sites.

Another three sites – Tau Tona, Amandelbult Dishaba, and Impala 4 – have experienced zero harm for 360 days.

Zero harm is defined as a situation where no injuries, not even minor ones, occur, while lost time injury (LTI) means that work time was lost due to an injury.

ROSOND, established over 50 years ago as RODIO/ROSOND, is active in underground mining development and exploration drilling, cementation works and pre-cementation of shafts as well as grout pack support systems.

Ricardo Ribeiro, Operations Director for ROSOND, says that underground diamond drilling has many hazards and the possibility for a serious accident is high.

“Activities require a great deal of manual handling and working conditions are physically demanding,” he says.

ROSOND has a policy of zero harm, and the safety of its employees is its first priority.

“We therefore scrutinise every possible hazard and do whatever is necessary to control and, if possible, eliminate the risks.”

Ribeiro attributes the drilling team’s success to several factors, including focusing on the top hazards and implementing various safety devices for the protection of employees.

The company has also gradually created a culture of safety through quarterly safety drives that remind employees of fundamentals and reinforce non-negotiables.

“Training programmes, including annual and refresher training, play a major role. Training concentrates on the safe operating procedures through theoretical and practical sessions facilitated by qualified trainers and assessors.”

Ribeiro adds that another driving force is objectives and targets.

“These are driven by a safety incentive scheme which rewards the teams with a safety bonus. Our partnership with our clients plays a big role through their safety programmes and standards.”

Supervisory staff also contribute by motivating drill teams.

Ribeiro concludes: “But it’s the drilling teams who are the heroes who make this possible. Without them, we do not have a business, and it is our responsibility to look after them and ensure they go home safely at the end of each day.

“We are extremely proud of this achievement and look forward to the next five years because we know that ‘zero harm’ is possible.”

ROSOND’s drilling includes development drilling, short hole (0-200m) and long hole (0-1000m) core drilling. Grouting comprises cover grouting, water and gas control and other specialised grouting works. ROSOND operates underground with several drilling machines and high-pressure cementation pumps and mixing equipment.

An important activity of ROSOND is the installation of grout packs – support systems that comprise the installation of automatic surface batching plants as well as underground relay stations. ROSOND operates several high pressure cementation pumps on surface and underground.